The Consortium

Why a consortium?

The Brisighella PDO Oil Consortium is established as per Article 2602 et seq. of the Italian Civil Code and works to protect, promote, develop and inform consumers, and generally look after interests related to the protected designation of origin.

The Consortium

  • makes suggestions for the production regulations and has an advisory role concerning the product;
  • defines programmes with structural and technical adjustment measures aimed at improving the quality of production;
  • promotes the adoption of resolutions in the manner and with the content set out in Article 15 of Italian Legislative Decree no. 102 of 27 May 2005, provided they meet the requirements of Article 14(15)(c) of Italian Law 526/99;
  • takes care of administrative, legal, jurisdictional and image protection aspects;
  • collaborates with the Central Inspectorate for the quality control of agri-food products, according to guidelines issued by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies regarding the supervision, protection and safeguarding of the PDO.

Why a consortium?

The Brisighella PDO Oil Consortium is established as per Article 2602 et seq. of the Italian Civil Code and works to protect, promote, develop and inform consumers, and generally look after interests related to the protected designation of origin.

The Consortium

  • makes suggestions for the production regulations and has an advisory role concerning the product;
  • defines programmes with structural and technical adjustment measures aimed at improving the quality of production;
  • promotes the adoption of resolutions in the manner and with the content set out in Article 15 of Italian Legislative Decree no. 102 of 27 May 2005, provided they meet the requirements of Article 14(15)(c) of Italian Law 526/99;
  • takes care of administrative, legal, jurisdictional and image protection aspects;
  • collaborates with the Central Inspectorate for the quality control of agri-food products, according to guidelines issued by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies regarding the supervision, protection and safeguarding of the PDO.

94000

olive trees

309

hectares

115

partners

5

towns

3

producers

Olive trees have been grown here since time immemorial

Going up the Lamone River valley leading from Faenza to Florence, we reach the Brisighella oil production area.

During archaeological excavations carried out in the 1950s, a rudimentary olive press was found 4 km from Brisighella, dating from the 2nd century AD, suggesting that olive trees have been grown in the Lamone Valley since ancient times and that they might have been a key source of life and trade.

Many writings and legal texts document this cultivation, and authors often praise the qualities of Brisighella oil, for example, the 19th-century historian Antonio Metelli, who writes: ‘In Brisighella, the olive trees always bear such perfect fruit that a very fine oil drips from them’

Other proof of the large-scale cultivation of olives in this area can be found in historical documents, literary works and notarial deeds from the 15th century onwards. More recent testimonials can be found in the work Le condizioni industriali della provincia di Ravenna 1888-1898 (‘The industrial conditions of the province of Ravenna, 1888-1898’) in the Historical Archive of Italian Industry, where news is reported about olive production and the flourishing processing industry in the municipality of Brisighella and province of Ravenna. Another interesting work is the Guida commerciale ed industriale della provincia di Ravenna (‘Commercial and industrial guide to the province of Ravenna’) (1913-1914), which says: Approximately seventy thousand olive trees are cultivated in this area of just three hundred hectares, mainly on the southern slope, on terraces or scattered over hillocks and valleys sheltered from the Tramontana winds.

Turning back to the present day, let’s explain the distinctive characteristics of this oil, deriving from the strong link with the nature of the production environment.

The two native olive varieties called Nostrana di Brisighella are the result of natural selection over the centuries and account for 80% of total production, while the varieties Ghiacciola and Colombina account for 5% each.

These native varieties are perfectly adapted to the climate and soil, and their physiology prevents attacks from the olive fruit fly, a parasite that is extremely harmful to the oil.

The Apennine environment experiences slight temperature variations between day and night during the olive ripening period, encouraging the accumulation of finer aromas in the fruit, making this oil unique in its category.

This typicity, this well-defined growing area, the historical documentation attesting to the quality of the oil since ancient times and the recent studies carried out by researchers from various universities, gave the producers enough material to jointly produce an application dossier. They submitted this to the competent authorities as per the rules in Italian Law 162/92 and thus obtained the protected designation of origin for Brisighella oil under Regulation (EC) No 1263 of 01/07/1996 on the registration of geographical indications.

Olive trees have been grown here since time immemorial

Going up the Lamone River valley leading from Faenza to Florence, we reach the Brisighella oil production area.

During archaeological excavations carried out in the 1950s, a rudimentary olive press was found 4 km from Brisighella, dating from the 2nd century AD, suggesting that olive trees have been grown in the Lamone Valley since ancient times and that they might have been a key source of life and trade.

Many writings and legal texts document this cultivation, and authors often praise the qualities of Brisighella oil, for example, the 19th-century historian Antonio Metelli, who writes: ‘In Brisighella, the olive trees always bear such perfect fruit that a very fine oil drips from them’

Other proof of the large-scale cultivation of olives in this area can be found in historical documents, literary works and notarial deeds from the 15th century onwards. More recent testimonials can be found in the work Le condizioni industriali della provincia di Ravenna 1888-1898 (‘The industrial conditions of the province of Ravenna, 1888-1898’) in the Historical Archive of Italian Industry, where news is reported about olive production and the flourishing processing industry in the municipality of Brisighella and province of Ravenna. Another interesting work is the Guida commerciale ed industriale della provincia di Ravenna (‘Commercial and industrial guide to the province of Ravenna’) (1913-1914), which says: Approximately seventy thousand olive trees are cultivated in this area of just three hundred hectares, mainly on the southern slope, on terraces or scattered over hillocks and valleys sheltered from the Tramontana winds.

Turning back to the present day, let’s explain the distinctive characteristics of this oil, deriving from the strong link with the nature of the production environment.

The two native olive varieties called Nostrana di Brisighella are the result of natural selection over the centuries and account for 80% of total production, while the varieties Ghiacciola and Colombina account for 5% each.

These native varieties are perfectly adapted to the climate and soil, and their physiology prevents attacks from the olive fruit fly, a parasite that is extremely harmful to the oil.

The Apennine environment experiences slight temperature variations between day and night during the olive ripening period, encouraging the accumulation of finer aromas in the fruit, making this oil unique in its category.

This typicity, this well-defined growing area, the historical documentation attesting to the quality of the oil since ancient times and the recent studies carried out by researchers from various universities, gave the producers enough material to jointly produce an application dossier. They submitted this to the competent authorities as per the rules in Italian Law 162/92 and thus obtained the protected designation of origin for Brisighella oil under Regulation (EC) No 1263 of 01/07/1996 on the registration of geographical indications.

Our recognitions

Since 1996, Brisighella PDO extra virgin olive oil has found success thanks to its taste and its characteristics that make it a one-of-a-kind product.

Charter

Charter

The Consortium participates in or subscribes to, by resolution of the general meeting, bodies and institutions that aim to achieve purposes similar to those of the Consortium, including, in particular, the promotion and development of extra virgin olive oils.
It provides legal, technical and scientific assistance and information to affirm the quality and image of the oil under its protection, in Italy and abroad.